"Connected to already connected device" repeats on both nodes


#1

“INFO: Connected to already connected device” repeats ever minute indefinitely on both nodes. The messages on each node refer to the other.

The 2 nodes are currently paired. They may have been previously paired, then unpaired, and then paired again. The nodes are currently running the same version but a different OS. v0.14.24, Linux (64 bit) v0.14.24, Windows (64 bit)

Everything works but is it possible to stop the message without completely deleting the configurations on both ends? I already tried resetting the configuration on the Windows node but would like to avoid resetting the Linux node.


(Audrius Butkevicius) #2

Are the nodes on the local network?


#3

No, both nodes are behind NAT routers on different local networks. However, there are other nodes on the same network as the Linux node and those other nodes may have paired with the remote Windows node.

Edit: The routers on both ends forward port 22000/TCP to each of the 2 nodes in question. Other local nodes do not get special treatment at the router level.


(Audrius Butkevicius) #4

Check config.xml files, I suspect you have duplicates in the configs or the connections are breaking between the nodes. Also providing some logs would help.


(Simon) #5

I have the exact same thing: Multiple devices behind one router, port forward of 22000 on the router to my homeserver. I am pretty sure the problem is, that in global discovery all devices other than the homeserver are also recorded to be on the router IP. Apparently global discovery is faster than local, so the homeserver tries to reach the router IP to connect to the other devices, but that leads back to itself -> confusion. However there is no actual problem except for the ugly log output.


(Audrius Butkevicius) #6

Can both nodes use both routers as gateways? As it seems both nodes end up identical addresses somehow. You can hover on addresses field for nodes while they are disconnected on both sides to see if you can find something funky. Also the fact that that message appears means you are disconnected from someone and that someones address is mapping to yourself, so check addresses of disconnected nodes.


#7

Just an update on my config:

node-A is behind router-A and runs v0.14.24, Windows (64 bit). node-B is behind router-B and runs v0.14.24, Linux (64 bit).

router-A forwards 50754/TCP to node-A:22000, set with UPNP. router-B forwards 22000/TCP to node-B:22000, set manually.

web-ui @ node-A node-B address: ***.***.***.***:22000 (roll-over: tcp-client)

web-ui @ node-B node-A address: ***.***.***.***:60331 (roll-over: tcp-server)

Later I plan to reset config on both ends, stop the other local nodes, and post some logs. Is it sufficient to delete config.xml on both the Windows and Linux? Does index-*.db contain any information about networking and discovery of nodes? Can announcements or queries be cached at the discovery servers or somewhere outside the nodes?

Edit: I don’t understand why the web-ui on node-B reports the address of node-A at port 60331 when node-A’s router forwards port 50754.


(Audrius Butkevicius) #8

Discovery is cached both server side and client side.

Already connected messages should only ocour if you have nodes that you are not connected to, and the only addresses that matter are the ones for devices you are not connected to.

When you connect somewhere, the source port is always random which explains the 60331.


(system) #9

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