Syncthing takes a lot of time to notice small changes

Hello,

I’m having the following problem: I have Syncthing installed on my Windows laptop and a remote linux server. They are using dynamic addresses and connecting via global discovery.

I am sharing a folder between this two devices, which has around 2500 files, 1GB, 20 folders.

When, for example, on my laptop, I change/delete/create a file within the folder, and then click Rescan, Syncthing does not detect that the folder changed on the local device. I also tried setting the rescan interval to like 15s, but it still takes several rescans for it to detect a file.

Apparently though, if I modify not one, but several files at once (ex deleting 100 files), then Syncthing notices that quickly. What’s wrong?

I need a fast response, since I’m using my laptop to edit some code files, which then I run on the server, and I need a fast workflow, so this is posing some problems.

Thanks in advance, Diogo Valada

What do you base this on? It sounds unlikely so it would be good to know what you’re looking at exactly. There will be a few seconds of lag before the change is handled on the other side, but it shouldn’t be much slower than that for a small change.

Also, what type of file is it? Is it some sort of magical memory mapped file or a file living on some non-standard filesystem/network drive?

No, I’m talking about a simple .txt file, store inside a shared folder in windows. Normal filesystem, same partition as the OS.

In Syncthing’s GUI, there’s a field called Latest Change. I’m assuming this represents the latest file changed, either due to remote changes or local right? If I modify a file locally, and then hit Rescan, shouldn’t the Latest Change field change to display this file?

Or does Latest Change only display remote-triggered modifications? Maybe I assumed the wrong behaviour for this.

That is last file changed by the remote side, not local side.

You’re weren’T the only one :wink: I was under the same impression, reading the title and learned by the time witnessing what files were shown.